Residential Premises

Larger scale works such as a rear extension, loft or basement conversion will almost certainly require Landlord’s consent and may also have to involve further investigations from a development valuation perspective, if consent can be withheld and a premium payable. The following are further examples of works that are likely to require Landlord’s consent:

  • The removal of loadbearing walls or formation of new openings
  • Removal of chimney breasts
  • Changing windows
  • Switching from soft floor coverings to wood flooring
  • Installing additional bathrooms or WCs

Typically requested information would be architectural and engineering drawings, engineering calculations, insurance documents, health & safety and Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM). The list of required information will vary from case to case, but will usually be much less onerous than for works on commercial premises.

One interesting query that is often raised is “do I need a party wall award with my freeholder?” Whilst a freeholder can insist on a notice and resulting award, the LTA that is produced for the freeholder will cover many of the same items and possibly go into a touch more detail. It should also be pointed out that when compared with a commercial LTA, a residential one can often be relatively simple, and the number of hours involvement from solicitors and surveyors kept to a minimum.

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